RSDU Identifies Indicators of S&D Best Practices

HIV-related stigma and discrimination emerge from and reinforce pre-existing gender, race and socio-economic inequities and prejudices. Pre-existing prejudices and inequities, combined with fears about HIV infection, provide a fertile environment for HIV-related stigma and discrimination to flourish.

By addressing S&D at a myriad of levels, outcomes of S&D reduction are therefore experienced in different settings and manifested in different ways.

Across different projects, programmes and activities, there are frequently observable impacts that may be used as indicators of a successful association between programme actions and outcomes. The project log frame of the RSDU, which is still evolving, seeks to evaluate some of these indicators of S&D reduction within the various groups, communities and workplaces targeted through the project. Some indicators may include:

 

In a community setting, for example, indicators of success might include:

  • Increased willingness of relatives and community members to care for HIV-positive people;
  • Enhanced care resulting in better quality of life for people living with HIV;
  • Increased willingness of community members to volunteer in HIV prevention and AIDS care programmes;
  • Increased disclosure of sero-positivity by people living with HIV, and their increased involvement in, and leadership of, prevention, care and advocacy efforts;
  • Reduction in self-stigma and increased confidence among people living with HIV; and a more open expression of positive attitudes within communities towards people living with and affected by HIV and AIDS.

 

In health-care settings, indicators of success might include:

  • Increased uptake of HIV counselling and testing;
  • Increased access to, and uptake of, treatment;
  • Reduced numbers of complaints of discrimination by people living with HIV and their families;
  • Improved quality of care of HIV-positive patients, resulting in enhanced quality of life; Increased willingness on the part of health workers to deal constructively with people living with HIV; and
  • Increased expression of positive attitudes towards people living with HIV by health workers in non-health-care settings.

 

In employment and in the workplace, indicators of success might include:

  • Reduction in complaints of discrimination;
  • Increased expression of positive attitudes towards people living with HIV by health workers in non-health-care settings.

 

In employment and in the workplace, indicators of success might include:

  • Reduction in complaints of discrimination;
  • Increase in volunteers within workplaces participating in specific AIDS programmes:
  • Increased openness of HIV-positive employees about their status;
  • Increased willingness of employees to work alongside people known to be living with HIV;
  • Increased uptake of voluntary counselling and testing;
  • Enhanced uptake of treatment services offered by workplaces; and
  • Supportive HIV workplace policies and practice.
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